[7+] Describe a plant, vegetable or crop that you are familiar with IELTS Cue-Card

In Describe a plant, vegetable or crop that you are familiar with Cue Card, you should say:

  1. What it is and where does it grow?
  2. How do you become familiar with it?
  3. What do you like or dislike about it?
  4. Explain why this is important for your country?
Describe a plant, vegetable or crop that you are familiar with IELTS Cue-Card
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Here are the band 7+ sample answers to Describe a plant, vegetable or crop that you are familiar with or Describe a plant grown in your country that you think is important IELTS Speaking Cue Card:

Sample Answer 1

Introducing a plant, vegetable or crop

  • India has a rich presence of flora and fauna across the land.
  • I also maintain a small garden in the backyard, where I have grown some familiar plants, vegetables and crops.
  • Today, I would happily like to talk about one such plant which is famous for cultural, medicinal and religious importance.

What it is and where does it grow?

  • In India, doesn’t matter if you are a gardener or not, or if your house has space for gardening or not, everyone has grown the Tulsi plant at home at least once.
  • Also called Holy Basil, it is considered the holiest plant of all and it is valued for its medicinal properties.
  • In rural houses and bungalows, Tulsi is grown in a unique permanent planter called ‘Tulsi Vrindavan’ in the middle of a front yard.
  • Besides. Tulsi can be easily grown in an 8-10 inch pot with well-drained soil.

How do you become familiar with it?

  • My sister is an agronomist at Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana.
  • She enlightened me about the benefits of growing Tulsi at home.
  • Then I did extensive research on the internet before finally planting it in my garden.

What do you like or dislike about it?

Things that I particularly like about the Tulsi plant are:

  • It has been my saviour, especially during winters. Taking a few leaves of Tulsi along with honey helps relieve cough and flu as it improves my immune health.
  • Secondly, Keeping this plant at home purifies the air. It is believed that the tulsi plant absorbs toxic gases such as sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, etc., from the air.
  • The plant creates a pleasant aroma, which keeps the surroundings fresh.
  • It is also auspicious for the financial condition of the family.
  • Having a basil plant at home brings peace and happiness to the mind.

Explain why this is important for your country?

  • It is commonly used in the traditional Indian medicine system, Ayurveda. Chemicals in the Tulsi plant are thought to decrease pain and swelling.
  • They also might lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. Moreover, Holy basil oil might act as an antioxidant.
  • Besides medicinal benefits, Tulsi is regarded as a sacred plant in Indian culture. Hindus regard it as an earthly manifestation of the goddess Tulasi; she is regarded as the avatar of Lakshmi.
  • These are some of the reasons why this plant is important for my country.

Concluding the Cue Card

  • In the end, I would just like to say that Tulsi is just one plant, in fact, India has hundreds of other plants, vegetables and crops that stand out for their distinct characteristics.

Sample Answer 2

India is a diversified country with a wide range of flora, vegetables, and crops. All of the plants are valuable in some way. But the plant I’ll be discussing today is the bamboo tree.

My younger brother recently gave it to me as a gift. In a mesmerising glass jar, the small bamboo sticks were strung together with crimson ribbons. When I was about 15 years old, I first noticed this plant in my neighbourhood.

The practise of preserving auspicious bamboo plants, which offer good luck and fortune to a family, is associated with bonsai bamboo plants. It is one of the most adaptable plants, with numerous applications. It can, for example, grow easily on deteriorated soil.

As a result, it can be utilised to repair the texture of soil that has been degraded by overgrazing and bad farming procedures. It also has a complicated root network. This is excellent for reducing soil erosion and flooding.

Another notable feature is that bamboo produces 35% more oxygen than other trees. According to research, bamboo can absorb up to 12 tonnes of CO2 per acre each year. As a result, this plant has the potential to significantly contribute to the improvement of my country’s ecosystem.

Finally, I can say that of all the plants, veggies, and crops I’m familiar with, Bonsai Bamboo is my favourite.

Follow-ups

Following are the probable Describe a plant, vegetable or crop that you are familiar with follow up questions that may be asked by the examiner in Speaking Part-3 of the test:

1. Do people in your country like to grow plants at home?

Indian people love home gardening. They all start with a sad patch of grass and as they keep growing, it transforms into a beautiful garden with flowers, fruit trees, veggie beds, raised beds, and garden art.

2. Do old people grow plants?

Of course! old people tend to indulge in gardening more often than youngsters. This is simply because they usually stay at home and caring for plants keeps them busy. They think that staying active and finding fulfilling hobbies to pass the time are important and beneficial to their physical and mental health. 

3. How do schools teach students to grow plants?

There are various schools in my locality that organise regular tree plantation drives across the city. The students actively volunteer to grow plants. In addition to this, another most effective method to teach students to grow plants is school gardening. As they practically do the work, they are more likely to be aware of growing plants, vegetables and crops.

4. What is the main plant of your country?

The Lotus, an aquatic plant, is India’s national flower. Signifying divine beauty that grows from the mud into a beautiful flower, a lotus flower also represents the purity of body, speech and mind in Indian culture.

5. How were plants grown in the past?

In the past, farmers would have to do fieldwork by hand or with horse-drawn equipment. This work would take a long time to complete, which meant that farms were smaller because farmers could only work so much land. Centuries later, they switched to modern farming full time, breeding both animals and plants, creating new varieties and breeds.

FAQs

1. Do people in your country like to grow plants at home?

They do, indeed. Home gardening is a popular hobby among city dwellers who have even the smallest amount of space for plants. Terrace gardening is also popular. I, too, have a kitchen garden. I don’t have a lot of space, but I’ve grown coriander, mint, green chilies, okra, and aubergine in pots. I also have a lemon tree, and we enjoy fresh lemons all year.

2. Do old people grow plants?

They do enjoy it. They are also knowledgeable. My granddad is often telling me about the water needs of plants. He also continues shifting the placement of our pots. He understands which plants want shade and which require sunlight.

3. How do schools teach students to grow plants?

Unfortunately, these things are not taught in schools. At least in the ones I’m familiar with. Some schools may be doing so by organising environmental-related activities.

4. What is the main plant of your country?

India has a diversified population and a tropical environment. Plants of all kinds thrive here. There is no vegetation that I can identify as the main plant. Basil is revered in Hindu households, ginger and turmeric offer medicinal properties, and aloe vera has grown in popularity.

5. How were plants grown in the past?

Plant fossils preserved in lowland or marine sediments record the evolutionary history of plants. Botanists today believe that plants evolved from algae; the plant kingdom’s development could have stemmed from evolutionary changes that happened when photosynthetic multicellular creatures reached the continents. The evolution of vascular tissues allowed plants to grow larger and thrive on land.

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I hope it gives you some realistic idea on how to carry a conversation around Describe a plant, vegetable or crop that you are familiar with or Describe a plant grown in your country that you think is important IELTS Cue card topic. However, it is strongly advised not to reproduce the same answer during the exam, as it may be used by many of our readers on the site. You should rather reformulate and personalise your answer.

If you still have any doubts, post them in the comments.

ALL THE BEST!

Rajit

Rajit Kaushal is the co-founder and an active blogger at 'CIC Talks'. He is best known for his rich expertise in IELTS & Canadian Immigration🇨🇦. You can reach out to him at Instagram & Twitter.

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